Recent Changes

Wednesday, April 18

  1. page Second Battle of El Alamein edited ... The battle stopped any chance of the Axis entering and controlling Egypt, which would have giv…
    ...
    The battle stopped any chance of the Axis entering and controlling Egypt, which would have given them access to the Middle East and the oil fields there.[11]
    A notable officer in this battle who had connections to the 2/17th battalion was Lieutenant Colonel Keith Magno, who was killed in action here after suffering severe wounds on 28 October. He was originally an officer from the 2/17th before he went on to take over the 2/15th battalion. At a point in the battle, he was offered shelter, but insisted on staying with his men. He subsequently lost an arm and suffered head and stomach wounds. Despite this he remained conscious, calm and concerned about his men, before he died of his wounds two days later.[12]
    {1.jpg} {2.jpg} {3.jpg}
    [1]Australian War Memorial, 2/17th Battalion //http://www.awm.gov.au/units/unit_11268.asp//
    [2] Australian War Memorial, 2/17th Battalion War Diary http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/records/awm52/8/3/17/awm52-8-3-17-15.pdf
    ...
    [11]Australian War Memorial, El Alamein, //http://www.awm.gov.au/units/event_180.asp//
    [12] Australian War Memorial, Remembering 1942: The Battle of El Alamein 23 October 1942 http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/alamein23/transcript.asp
    {1.jpg} {2.jpg} {3.jpg}
    [1]http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/alamein23/transcript.asp - Dr Mark Johnston
    [2] Ibid
    http://historywarsweapons.com/battle-of-el-alamein/
    http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/battle_of_el_alamein.htm

    Information researched by Brenton
    Editing, Layout and title images done by Dominique
    (view changes)
  2. page Second Battle of El Alamein edited {title.png} {battle_of_el_alamein.png} Second The second Battle of El Alamein - Lost 62 m…
    {title.png}
    {battle_of_el_alamein.png}
    Second
    The second Battle of El Alamein
    - Lost 62 men
    o 203 Wounded
    o 4 Captured
    -
    was a critical offensive against German and Italian forces in which the 2/17th Battalion, as a part of the Australian 9th Division played a critical part. The battle lasted from 23 October-October until 4 November 1942
    Battle stopped any chance
    1942. El Alamein is located about 100 miles, or 160 kilometers north of Egypt’s capital.[1]
    At this stage,
    the Axis from entering2/17th Division was under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Noel ‘Red Fox’ Simpson, CB, CBE, DSO & Bar.[2] [3]
    The battalion had been involved in training in Lebanon
    and controlling Egypt, which would have given them accessSyria for the first half of 1942, where they moved after the Battle of Tobruk. The 9th division, and subsequently the 2/17th were then moved from Syria to El Alamein, after the middle-eastinflux of German and Italian troops in July 1942. At this point the oil fields there
    Battle described as
    area had become a turning pointcrucial position in the war. The 2/17th reached to forward position in mid-July. Once there the division held the area for an extended period of time (around 4 months) while the conflict [1]British commanding officers prepared a new offensive against the Axis forces. The battalion spent about two months during this period observing the enemy defences from early August.[4]
    Australian 9th
    ...
    the Axis minefields
    Original
    minefields.
    The original
    plan of
    ...
    tanks was determined to be impossible. IdeaThe idea then became to
    ...
    the stronger axisAxis units to
    ...
    be pinned down
    Australians
    down. [5]
    On 25 October the Australians captured a point known as trig 29, which was held by the 2/48th battalion and then by the 2/17th. The second 17th suffered reasonably heavy losses here. It was, however, a key position in the battle.
    Trig 29 was described by one Australian signaler as “the worst spot I have been anywhere in this war.”[6]
    The Australian forces as a whole
    had about
    ...
    in this battle-battle, even thought they only made
    ...
    of the forces.[7]
    In the course of the battle, 62 men were killed, 203 were wounded and 4 were captured from the 2/17th Battalion.[8]
    After the battle the 2/17th were recalled from the Middle East in order to address the situation in the Pacific Islands, where Japanese
    forces [2]
    Lieutenant-
    threatened mainland Australia. They left Suez aboard the Acquitania on 27 January 1943 and subsequently left Sydney on 27 February of that year.[9]
    The victory at El Alamein is considered to be a major turning point in the war, and one of the major victories for the Allies in North Africa. [10]
    The battle stopped any chance of the Axis entering and controlling Egypt, which would have given them access to the Middle East and the oil fields there.[11]
    A notable officer in this battle who had connections to the 2/17th battalion was Lieutenant
    Colonel Keith Magno-Magno, who was killed in action- Officeraction here after suffering severe wounds on 28 October. He was originally an officer from the 2/17th who tookbefore he went on to take over the 2/15th
    25th October- Australians captured
    battalion. At a point known as trig 29- held byin the 2/48thbattle, he was offered shelter, but insisted on staying with his men. He subsequently lost an arm and then the 2/17th- suffered heavy losses there- key position in the battlehead and stomach wounds. Despite this he remained conscious, calm and concerned about his men, before he died of his wounds two days later.[12]
    [1]Australian War Memorial, 2/17th Battalion //http://www.awm.gov.au/units/unit_11268.asp//
    [2] Australian War Memorial, 2/17th Battalion War Diary http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/records/awm52/8/3/17/awm52-8-3-17-15.pdf
    [3] Australian War Memorial, NX12221 Noel William 'Red Fox' Simpson, CB, CBE, DSO & Bar, //http://www.awm.gov.au/units/people_1080602.asp//
    [4] Australian War Memorial, 2/17th Battalion //http://www.awm.gov.au/units/unit_11268.asp//
    [5] Ibid.
    [6] Australian War Memorial, Remembering 1942: The Battle of El Alamein 23 October 1942 http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/alamein23/transcript.asp
    [7] Ibid.
    [8] Australian War Memorial, Remembering 1942: The Battle of El Alamein 23 October 1942 http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/alamein23/transcript.asp
    [9] Australian War Memorial, 2/17th Battalion //http://www.awm.gov.au/units/unit_11268.asp//
    [10] Ibid.
    [11]Australian War Memorial, El Alamein, //http://www.awm.gov.au/units/event_180.asp//
    [12] Australian War Memorial, Remembering 1942: The Battle of El Alamein 23 October 1942 http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/alamein23/transcript.asp

    {1.jpg} {2.jpg} {3.jpg}
    [1]http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/remembering1942/alamein23/transcript.asp - Dr Mark Johnston
    ...
    http://historywarsweapons.com/battle-of-el-alamein/
    http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/battle_of_el_alamein.htm
    ...
    by Brenton
    Editing, Layout and title images done by Dominique
    (view changes)

Tuesday, April 17

  1. page Corporal John Hurst Edmondson VC (1914 - 1941) edited {title.png} {cjhe.png} {art27532_350w.jpg} {art27532_350w.jpg} {cjhe.png} Despite almos…

    {title.png}
    {cjhe.png}
    {art27532_350w.jpg}
    {art27532_350w.jpg} {cjhe.png}
    Despite almost five decades since federation, deep-seated loyalty towards the British Commonwealth and the Crown influenced many to join the Australian Imperial Forces (AIF). As WWII dawned, thousands of Sydney’s young men enlisted with patriotic and energetic ambition and in 1940, such a calibre of men included Corporal John Hurst Edmondson.
    John Hurst Edmondson was born on the 8th October 1914, in Wagga Wagga, NSW. The only child of parents Joseph William Edmondson and wife Maude Elizabeth, nee Hurst; the family later moved to a farm in Liverpool, in Sydney’s west.[1] Growing up, and later working with his father in their family farm – John became an active citizen of his community, becoming a council member of Liverpool Agricultural society, acting as steward for various productions. [2]
    ...
    [9] Ibid
    [10]Australian War Memorial, ‘Forever Young’, Australian Government Department of Veteran Affairs, http://www.australiansatwar.gov.au/stories/stories_war=W2_id=8.html. [1 April 2012]
    ...
    WalkerEditing, Images, LayoutLayout, Audio and title
    (view changes)
  2. page Timeline edited {title.png} {title.png} {timeline.jpg} The following is an abridged timeline of the 2/17t…
    {title.png}
    {title.png}

    {timeline.jpg}
    The following is an abridged timeline of the 2/17th Battalion’s involvement in the Second World War. Attention is paid to the Battalion’s important actions, the experiences of individuals within the Battalion and the connection between the Battalion and the city of Sydney. Excerpts from the Battalion’s Unit Diary and the memoire of H.D. Wells, a corporal with the 2/17th, will be featured to further these points of significance.
    (view changes)
  3. page Timeline edited ... {Image_1_-_Bn_Diary.jpg} Extract from 2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary, 7 May 1940**[2]*…
    ...
    {Image_1_-_Bn_Diary.jpg}
    Extract from 2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary, 7 May 1940**[2]**
    2/17th Battalion continued to grow over the course of May 1940 as new recruits arrived.
    {Image_2_-_Scan.jpg}
    New2/17th Battalion continued to grow over the course of May 1940 as new recruits arrived.New enlistments arriving
    {Image_3_-_Scan.jpg}
    The first hundred**[4]**
    ...
    April 1941 – October 1941: TobrukThe 2/17th Battalion, as part of the 9th Division, remained under siege by General Rommel’s Afrika Korps in Tobruk from the beginning of the siege in April 1941 until their withdrawal in October 1942. A more fulsome account than the summary one offered below can be accessed elsewhere in this exhibition.
    {Image_8_-_Scan.jpg}
    Tobruk Fortress**[16]**
    The 2/17th Battalion features prominently in the defensive actions of the Allied forces in Tobruk for the duration of the siege. Of particular note, as a part of the 20th Brigade the 2/17th repelled the initial probing attack near the Acroma Road on April 8 1941 and the Easter Attacks on Tobruk in the following days.[17] During this encounter 17 German tanks were destroyed and German casualties (excluding all those outside the defensive perimeter) numbered at least 150 dead and 250 captured, mostly in the 2/17th Battalion’s positions.[18]
    {Image_9_-_Diary.jpg}
    ...
    The ‘Bush Artillery’ – a gun crew from the 2/17th Battalion[20]
    On 22 Oct 1941 the last of the 2/17th Battalion was withdrawn from Tobruk’s front lines in a scheduled change-over with British units, fresh to face the ongoing siege, and by 25 October the 2/17 Battalion had embarked the HMS Kingston bound for Alexandria.[21]
    {Image_11_-_Diary.jpg} Extract
    Extract
    from 2/17th
    Upon leaving Tobruk, Wells observed that the troops were hushed, “many thinking of those who would never leave the sands of this fortress” and that “there was no display of joy or thankfulness among the troops...talk was subdued as if they were still within hearing of the enemy.”[23]
    October 1941 – July 1942: The LevantBetween October 1941 and July 1942 the 2/17th Battalion was stationed first at Gaza in Palestine, and later in Lebanon and Syria to continue training.[24]
    ...
    July 1942 – November 1942: El AlameinThe 2/17th Battalion moved to El Alamein in mid-July 1942 in response to the impending German and Italian threat. As a part of the 9th Australian Division, 2/17th Battalion fought with distinction in what proved to be the decisive battle of the North African theatre, the Second Battle of El Alamein, between 23 October and 5 November 1942. A more fulsome account than the summary one offered here can be accessed elsewhere in this exhibition.
    {Image_13_-_Diary.jpg}
    ...
    October 1942**[28]**
    H.D. Wells illustrates the individual experience of the battle, the victory and the aftermath;
    “Another thousand yards and everything seemed to go crazy. Caught in the midst of a creeping artillery barrage...flashes of light from the explosions of shells and mortar bombs lit the area, while screaming slivers of jagged steel made whistling noises all around us. Our supply trucks were making bonfires of death as their cargoes of ammunition exploded, and the advancing troops seemed to hesitate but then, like a dog which has just emerged from water and shaken itself to be free from a fear of drowning, once again we began the forward movement.” [29] - H.D. Wells
    ...
    Map of Red Beach and Lae**[41]**
    Having captured Lae, the 2/17th Battalion re-embarked on 21 September and landed the following day, 22 September, at Scarlet Beach with the aim of marching south and capturing the town of Finschhafen. The landing at Scarlet Beach met with strong Japanese resistance;
    ...
    firing at us.”**[42]**Heavyus.”**[42]**
    Heavy
    fighting continued
    {Image_18_-_Scan.jpg}
    Map of Sio Campaign**[43]**
    ...
    Map of the Brunei Campaign**[49]**
    {Image_22_-_Diary.jpg}
    Troops of 2/17th Battalion approaching Green Beach in landing craft**[50]**
    {Image_23_-_AWM_108947.jpg}

    Extract from 2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary, June 1945**[51]**
    {Image_23_-_AWM_108947.jpg}
    Troops of 2/17th Battalion approaching Green Beach in landing craft**[50]**

    {Image_24_-_AWM_109304.jpg}
    Troops of 2/17th Battalion in Brunei township**[52]**
    (view changes)
  4. page Battalion Overview edited {title.png} {title.png} {colour_patch_11268_596618.JPG} 2/17th Battalion Colour Patch[1]
    {title.png}
    {title.png}

    {colour_patch_11268_596618.JPG}
    2/17th Battalion Colour Patch[1]
    (view changes)
  5. page home edited ... On the 26th of April 1940 the order was given for some nine hundred young Australians to gathe…
    ...
    On the 26th of April 1940 the order was given for some nine hundred young Australians to gather at Ingleburn Army Camp, in Sydney’s south-western suburbs, to form the 17th Battalion of the Second Australian Imperial Force. Over the next five years these soldiers of the 2/17th would be deeply shaped by their experience of the war, for better and for worse, “with ups and downs, good times and bad, easy and tough, as fate dictated”.[1] Many boys became men, many men became friends, many men lost their lives and all men lost some friends.
    -------------------------
    ...
    at war.
    The ‘impacts’ of conflict are commonly rendered in forms abstract to human experience, as wider processes and grand narratives devoid of the real meanings attached to them by individuals. By examining the experience of the 2/17th as an individual Battalion the impacts of war upon Sydney are personalised and their meanings to contemporary Sydney are uncovered.
    ...
    their legacy.
    That

    That
    legacy of
    ...
    the war.
    Sydney would do well to learn about and remember the 2/17th– the Sydney past, the Sydney at war.
    [1] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, ‘What We Have - We Hold!’: A history of the 2/17th Australian Infantry Battalion, 1940-1945, 2/17 Battalion History Committee, Balgowlah, 1990, p.318.
    ...
    ibid., p.xiii.
    Information researched by Nick & DominiqueLayout done by Dominique
    (view changes)
  6. page Timeline edited ... 8 February 1946: Disbanded2/17th Battalion finally disbanded at its place of origin, the Ingle…
    ...
    8 February 1946: Disbanded2/17th Battalion finally disbanded at its place of origin, the Ingleburn Army Camp is Sydney’s south-west suburbs.[55]
    [1] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, ‘What We Have - We Hold!’: A history of the 2/17th Australian Infantry Battalion, 1940-1945, 2/17 Battalion History Committee, Balgowlah, 1990, p.1.[2] AWM52 8/3/17/1, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, May 1940, p.3.[3] ‘New enlistments arriving at camp’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.2.[4] ‘The first hundred’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.3.[5] AWM52 8/3/17/1, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, May 1940, p.8.[6] H.D. Wells, ‘B’ Company Second Seventeenth Infantry, H.D. Wells, Toowoon Bay, 1984, p.17.[7] AWM52 8/3/17/2, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, June-August 1940, p.5.[8] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.5.[9] Wells, p.17.[10] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.5.[11]ibid., p.6.[12] ibid., p.8.[13] Wells, p.19.[14] AWM52 8/3/17/3, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, September-October 1940, p.103.[15]ibid., p.104.[16] ‘Tobruk Fortress’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.36.[17] ibid., pp.36-37.[18] ibid., p.43.[19]AWM52 8/3/17/7, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, April-June 1941, p.7.[20] ‘The ‘Bush Artillery’ – a gun crew from the 2/17th Battalion’, Australian War Memorial (AWM), ‘Image 020279’.[21] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.71.[22]AWM52 8/3/17/9, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, September-October 1941, p.141.[23] Wells, pp.98-99.[24] ‘2/17th Battalion’, Australian War Memorial, http://www.awm.gov.au/units/unit_11268.asp.[25] Wells, p.100.[26] ‘A group of 2/17th Infantry Battalion NCOs in Palestine’, Australian War Memorial (AWM), ‘Image 024180’.[27] Wells, p.100.[28]AWM52 8/3/17/15, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, October-December 1942, p.3.[29] Wells, pp.128-129.[30] ibid., pp.131-132.[31] ibid., p.132.[32] ‘2/17th Battalion’, Australian War Memorial, http://www.awm.gov.au/units/unit_11268.asp.[33]AWM52 8/3/17/16, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, January-May 1943, p.34.[34] Wells, p.143.[35] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.187.[36] Wells, p.143.[37] ‘Sydney welcomes the return of the 2/17th Battalion’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.187.[38] Wells, p.152.[39] ‘Red Beach Landing Diagram’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.211.[40] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.220.[41] ‘Map of Red Beach and Lae’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.209.[42] Wells, p.156.[43] ‘Map of Sio Campaign’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.276.[44] ibid., p.283.[45] ibid.[46] ‘The landing beach for the Sio mission’, Australian War Memorial (AWM), ‘Image 070333’.[47] AWM52 8/3/17/20, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, January-February 1944, p.4.[48] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.309.[49] ‘Map of the Brunei Campaign’, in 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.303.[50] ‘Troops of 2/17th Battalion approaching Green Beach in landing craft’, Australian War Memorial (AWM), ‘Image 108947’[51] AWM52 8/3/17/27, ‘2/17th Infantry Battalion Unit Diary’, June 1945, p.23.[52] ‘Troops of 2/17th Battalion in Brunei township’, Australian War Memorial (AWM), ‘Image 109304’.[53] ‘Members of 2/17th Battalion searching the bodies of Japanese soldiers for documents, Brunei township’, Australian War Memorial (AWM), ‘Image109317’[54] 2/17 Battalion History Committee, p.318.[55] ‘2/17th Battalion’, Australian War Memorial, http://www.awm.gov.au/units/unit_11268.asp.
    ...
    by Dominique
    (view changes)

More